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The Institute for European Studies at the Department of International Relations of Tallinn School of Economics and Business Administration (Tallinn University of Technology), Estonia has published a peer-reviewed serial edition called Proceedings of the Institute for European Studies (abbreviation IES Proceedings) for some years.

Since 2009 it is a peer-reviewed international research journal with an international editorial and extensive international editorial board, available in EBSCO databases. The scope of the journal comprises a large spectrum of social, political, legal and cultural issues related to the recent development in the European Union and its member states such as:

The maximum air temperature record for this year was surpassed in the South Estonian towns of Elva and Valga Monday evening as the temperature hit 30.8 degrees Celsius in Elva and 30.5 degrees in Valga between 6 and 7 p.m.
As the rising trend in air temperatures continues, several more records are expected to be set in southeastern and central Estonia during Tuesday, Merike Merilain, head of the weather forecasts department of the Estonian Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology, told BNS.

*Two months into this year’s Expo, in Shanghai, Estonia has recorded the millionth visitor to its  pavilion, reports EPL Online. This visitor was a 17-year-old Chinese schoolboy named Wang Qi. The number of visitors at the pavilion will probably exceed the total number of residents in Estonia before the end of July. The main attraction in the pavilion is the installation of 33 giant piggy-banks, each of which represents a different idea on how to improve cities’ social, economic and living environments.

Dr. Henn H. Soonpää, 80, of Grand Forks, died unexpectedly on Thursday, July 1, 2010, in St. Mary's Hos-pital, Rochester, Minnesota.
Henn Soonpää was born to Karl Johannes and Antonie (Adamson) Soonpää on March 18, 1930, in Tallinn-Nõmme, Estonia. He was raised and educated there until the family left Estonia to escape Communist occupation. They lived as displaced persons in Geislingen, Germany, for four years until moving to the United States in 1949.

After months of build-up and clearing the final hurdles, Estonia has officially been given the go-ahead from Brussels to become the 17th member of the eurozone at the beginning of next year.
The EU on Tuesday gave the small country the green light for taking on the currency as of Jan. 1, converting at the current exchange rate of 15.6466 Kroon per Euro.

To commemorate the Smithsonian Presents Travels with Rick Steves magazine -- now on sale online, and at newsstands nationwide -- Rick is blogging about the 20 top destinations featured in that issue. One of those destinations is Tallinn, the capital of Estonia.
Visiting a tiny land like Estonia, I'm impressed by the resilience of a small nation. How can just over a million Estonians survive the centuries wedged between Russia and Germany? With the agenda of tyrants to the East and West, I'd think Estonia would fare like a sheet of Kleenex in a flushing toilet.

Young people from Russia, Finland, but also for example from Japan, Serbia, Turkey, France, US, Romania and Italy have already signed up to spend three weeks of their summer vacation in Tallinn in order to learn Estonian language at the Tallinn Summer School, intensive language course organized for the fifth year in a row by the Tallinn University.
In fact, even though the Tallinn University summer program offers 16 different courses, including Russian, English, Spanish and Italian language, but also for example Social Marketing, Digital Photography, and Creative Writing in English, it is the Estonian course that is most popular, and is offered both for beginners as well as on advanced level. Twenty scholarships were offered to the best applicants by the Estonian Institute, the association supporting the teaching of Estonian language abroad and to foreign students.

Euro is about to come and the Estonian society is worried about what is going to happen then. Dr. Robert Pefferly Jr., Associate Professor of Economics at Estonian Business School (EBS), spoke with Estonian Free Press to express his point of view and his analysis of the current situation.
What is your personal vision about the economical situation in Estonia during the last years?
What we just went through is a totally traditional classic bubble with prices fluctuating around a strange attractor based upon (real) fundamentals.
It is used to take about 20 years to repeat the cycle, now it seems to take approximately from 5-9 years to go through the entire cycle. The information technology revolution (now over 120 years old) seems to be increasing our cycle speeds too.

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